Gobekli Tepe is covered in Australian Aboriginal art work


Bruce R Fenton’s new book The Forgotten Exodus: The Into Africa Theory of Human Evolution provides fascinating research supporting the Out of Australia theory – scroll to 1h for the meat of the argument

The “Out of Africa” theory has long been used in the field of paleoanthropology (the study of the origins and predecessors of the present human species, using fossils and other remains), to explain the geographic origin of modern day humans. In the absence of an absolute consensus in this area of research, most paleoanthropologists agree with the basic theory, which postulates that the very first Homo sapiens emerged in Africa around 200,000 years ago, and eventually set forth from their homeland to conquer the world.

It’s considered a nice story, very compelling even, and certainly, there are many archaeological sites and genetic studies which tend to favour it as fact. But the question remains, is it true?

For over a century, research scientists across the globe have given the impression to the public that they require only a few final details to perfect their popular consensus model for human evolution. This book, however, the result of three years of investigation into cutting edge archaeological and genetic data, is set to displace the existing scientific paradigm in human evolution. It potentially marks the end of the ‘Out of Africa Theory’ of human origins.

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